Actions

Enroth Rules: Characters

From DivNull RPG

Abilities[edit]

The PC’s have six abilities: Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma.

Rolling for initial abilities are 3d6 (3-18), six times. Then choose where you would like to put your stats. Once the six results are written, they may be modified by lowering one stat by two and then raising a different one by one (e.g. lower Wisdom from a 10 to 8, raise Dexterity from 14 to 15).

Strength[edit]

Table 1: Strength
Ability Score Dmg. Adj. Weight Allow. Max. Press
1 -4 1 3
2 -2 1 5
3 -1 5 10
4-5 -1 10 25
6-7 None 20 55
8-9 None 35 90
10-11 None 40 115
12-13 None 45 140
14-15 None 55 170
16 +1 70 195
17 +1 85 220
18 +2 110 255
19 +3 135 280
20 +3 160 305
21 +4 185 330
22 +5 235 380
23 +6 335 480
24 +7 485 640
25 +8 535 700
26 +9 635 810
27 +10 785 970
28 +11 935 1,130
29 +12 1,235 1,440
30+ +14 1,535 1,750

Strength (Str) measures a character’s muscle, endurance, and stamina. Exceptional Strength increases the damage he causes with each hit, and increases the weight the character is able to carry without a penalty for encumbrance (see below).

The rest of this section on Strength consists of explanations of the columns in Table 1. Refer to the table as you read.

Damage Adjustment applies to combat. The listed number is added to or subtracted from the dice rolled to determine the damage caused by an attack (regardless of subtractions, a successful attack roll can never cause less than 1 point of damage). For example, a mace normally causes 1d6 points of damage (a range of 1 to 6). An attacker with Strength 17 causes one extra point of damage, for a range of 2 to 7 points of damage. The damage adjustment does NOT apply to missile weapons.

Weight Allowance is the weight (in pounds) a character can carry without being encumbered (encumbrance measures how a character’s possessions hamper his movement—see Combat). These weights are expressed in pounds. A character carrying up to the listed weight can move his full movement rate.

Maximum Press is the heaviest weight a character can pick up and lift over his head. A character cannot walk more than a few steps this way. No human or humanoid creature without exceptional Strength can lift more than twice his body weight over his head. In 1987, the world record for lifting a weight overhead in a single move was 465 pounds. A heroic Knight with Strength of 23 (see Table 1) can lift up to 480 pounds the same way and he can hold it overhead for a longer time!

Dexterity[edit]

Table 2: Dexterity
Ability Score React Adj. Hit Prob. Def Adj.
1 -6 -6 -5
2 -4 -4 -5
3 -3 -3 -4
4 -2 -2 -3
5 -1 -1 -2
6 0 0 -1
7-14 0 0 0
15 0 0 +1
16 +1 +1 +2
17 +2 +2 +3
18 +2 +2 +4
19-21 +3 +3 +4
22-26 +4 +4 +5
27+ +5 +5 +6


Dexterity

Dexterity (Dex) encompasses several physical attributes including hand-eye coordination, agility, reaction speed, reflexes, and balance. Dexterity affects a character’s reaction to a threat or surprise, his accuracy with weapons and bows, and his ability to dodge an enemy’s blows.

The rest of this section on Dexterity consists of explanations of the columns in Table 2. Refer to the table as you read.

Reaction Adjustment modifies the die roll to see if a character is surprised when he unexpectedly encounters NPCs. The more positive the modifier, the less likely the character is to be surprised.

Hit Probability is used to modify a character’s die roll whenever he uses a weapon (a melee, or bow weapon). A positive number makes it easier for the character to hit with a weapon, while a negative number makes it harder.

Defensive Adjustment applies to a character’s luck rolls against attacks that can be dodged—lightning bolts, boulders, etc. It also modifies the character’s Armor Class, representing his ability to dodge normal missiles and parry weapon thrusts. For example, Rath is wearing chainmail, giving him an Armor Class of 15. If his Dexterity score is 16, his Armor Class is modified by +2 to 17, making him harder to hit. If his Dexterity score is 5, his Armor Class is modified by -2 to 13, making him easier to hit. (In some situations, beneficial Dexterity modifiers to Armor Class do not apply. Usually this occurs when a character is attacked from behind or when his movement is restricted—attacked while prone, tied up, on a ledge, climbing a rope, etc.)

Constitution[edit]

Table 3: Constitution
Ability Score Hit Point Adj.
1 -3
2-3 -2
4-6 -1
7-14 0
15 +1
16 +2
17 +3
18 +4
19-22 +5
23-26 +6
27+ +7

A character’s Constitution (Con) score encompasses his physique, fitness, health, and physical resistance to hardship, injury, and disease. Since this ability affects the character’s hit points, it is vitally important to all classes.

The rest of this section on Constitution consists of explanations of the columns in Table 3. Refer to the table as you read.

Hit Point Adjustment is added to or subtracted from each Hit Die rolled for the character. However, no Hit Die ever yields less than 1 hit point, regardless of modifications. If an adjustment would lower the number rolled to 0 or less, consider the final result to be 1. Always use the character’s current Constitution to determine hit point bonuses and penalties.

If a character’s Constitution changes during the course of adventuring, his hit points may be adjusted up or down to reflect the change. The difference between the character’s current hit point bonus (if any) and the new bonus is multiplied by the character’s level and added to or subtracted from the character’s total. If Delsenora’s Constitution increased from 16 to 17, she would gain 1 hit point for every level she had.

Intelligence[edit]

Table 4: Intelligence
Ability Score Bonus SP/Lvl
1-12 0
13-15 1
16-18 2
19-21 3
22-26 4
27+ 5

Intelligence

Intelligence (Int) represents a character’s memory, reasoning, and learning ability, including areas outside those measured by the written word.

The rest of this section on Intelligence consists of explanations of the columns in Table 4. Refer to the table as you read.

Bonus SP/Lvl are the extra Spell Points given to Sorcerer, Archer, and Druid characters. These extra points are given to the character for each level attained.

If a character’s Intelligence changes during the course of adventuring, his Spell Points may be adjusted up or down to reflect the change. The difference between the character’s current Spell Point bonus (if any) and the new bonus is multiplied by the character’s level and added to or subtracted from the character’s total. If Merlin’s Intelligence increased from 15 to 16, he would gain 1 Spell Point for every level he had.

Wisdom[edit]

Table 5: Wisdom
Ability Score Bonus SP/Lvl Magical Def. Adj.
1 0 -6
2 0 -5
3 0 -4
4 0 -2
5-7 0 -1
8-12 0 0
13-15 1 0
16-17 2 +1
18-19 2 +2
20-21 3 +3
22-23 3 +4
24-26 4 +5
27+ 5 +5

Wisdom

Wisdom (Wis) describes a composite of the character’s enlightenment, judgment, guile, willpower, common sense, and intuition. It can affect the character’s resistance to magical attack.

The rest of this section on Wisdom consists of explanations of the columns in Table 5. Refer to the table as you read.

Bonus SP/Lvl are the extra Spell Points given to Cleric, Paladin, and Druid characters. These extra points are given to the character for each level attained.

If a character’s Wisdom changes during the course of adventuring, his Spell Points may be adjusted up or down to reflect the change. The difference between the character’s current Spell Point bonus (if any) and the new bonus is multiplied by the character’s level and added to or subtracted from the character’s total. If Constantine’s Wisdom increased from 15 to 16, he would gain 1 Spell Point for every level he had.

Magical Defense Adjustment listed on Table 5 applies to Luck rolls against magical spells that attack the mind: Charm, Feeblemind, Mass Fear, Paralyze, etc. These bonuses and penalties are applied automatically, without any conscious effort from the character.

Charisma[edit]

Table 6: Charisma
Ability Score Reaction Adj.
1 -7
2 -6
3 -5
4 -4
5 -3
6 -2
7 -1
8-12 0
13 +1
14 +2
15 +3
16 +5
17 +6
18 +7
19 +8
20 +9
21-22 +10
23-24 +11
25-26 +12
27+ +13

Charisma

The Charisma (Cha) score measures a character’s persuasiveness, personal magnetism, and ability to lead. It is not a reflection of physical attractiveness, although attractiveness certainly plays a role. It is important to all characters, but especially to those who must deal with nonplayer characters (NPCs), mercenary hirelings, retainers, and intelligent monsters.

The rest of this section on Charisma consists of explanations of the columns in Table 6. Refer to the table as you read.

Reaction Adjustment indicates the penalty or bonus due to the character because of Charisma when dealing with nonplayer characters and intelligent creatures. For example, Rath encounters a minotaur, an intelligent creature. Rath’s Charisma is only 6, so he is starting off with one strike against him. He probably should try to overcome this slight handicap by making generous offers of gifts or information.

Races[edit]

All basic races are represented in Enroth. Although humans are overwhelmingly part of the landscape, there are some demi-humans who like to spend their times in human towns. Any race can become any class.

Dwarves

Dwarves are short, stocky fellows, easily identified by their size and shape. They average 4 to 4-1/2 feet tall. They have ruddy cheeks, dark eyes, and dark hair. Dwarves generally live for 350 years.

Dwarves tend to be dour and taciturn. They are given to hard work and care little for most humor. They are strong and brave. They enjoy beer, ale, mead, and even stronger drink. Their chief love, however, is precious metal, particularly gold. They prize gems, of course, especially diamonds and opaque gems (except pearls, which they do not like). Dwarves like the earth and dislike the sea. Not overly fond of elves, they have a fierce hatred of orcs and goblins. Their short, stocky builds make them ill-suited for riding horses or other large mounts (although ponies present no difficulty), so they tend to be a trifle dubious and wary of these creatures. Though dwarves are suspicious and avaricious, their courage and tenacity more than compensate for these shortcomings.

Dwarves typically dwell in hilly or mountainous regions. They prefer life in the comforting gloom and solidness that is found underground.

Due to their sturdy nature, Dwarves receive a +1 bonus to their initial Constitution scores, but have a -1 penalty to their Dexterity scores.

Elves

Elves tend to be somewhat shorter and slimmer than normal humans. Their features are finely chiseled and delicate, and they speak in melodic tones. Although they appear fragile and weak, as a race they are quick and strong. Elves often live to be over 1,200 years old, although long before this time they feel compelled to depart the realms of men and mortals. Where they go is uncertain, but it is an undeniable urge of their race.

Elves are often considered frivolous and aloof. In fact, they are not, although humans often find their personalities impossible to fathom. They concern themselves with natural beauty, dancing and frolicking, playing and singing, unless necessity dictates otherwise. They are not fond of ships or mines, but enjoy growing things and gazing at the open sky. Even though elves tend toward haughtiness and arrogance at times, they regard their friends and associates as equals. They do not make friends easily, but a friend (or enemy) is never forgotten. They prefer to distance themselves from humans, have little love for dwarves, and hate the evil denizens of the woods.

Their humor is clever, as are their songs and poetry. Elves are brave but never foolhardy. They eat sparingly; they drink mead and wine, but seldom to excess. While they find well-wrought jewelry a pleasure to behold, they are not overly interested in money or gain. They find magic and swordplay (or any refined combat art) fascinating. If they have a weakness it lies in these interests.

Due to their gracefulness, Elves receive a +1 bonus to their initial Dexterity scores, but have a -1 penalty to their Constitution scores.

Gnomes

Kin to dwarves, gnomes are noticeably smaller than their distant cousins. Gnomes, as they proudly maintain, are also less rotund than dwarves. Their noses, however, are significantly larger. Most gnomes have dark tan or brown skin and white hair. A typical gnome lives for 350 years.

Gnomes have lively and sly senses of humor, especially for practical jokes. They have a great love of living things and finely wrought items, particularly gems and jewelry. Gnomes love all sorts of precious stones and are masters of gem polishing and cutting.

Gnomes prefer to live in areas of rolling, rocky hills, well wooded and uninhabited by humans. Their diminutive stature has made them suspicious of the larger races—humans and elves—although they are not hostile. They are sly and furtive with those they do not know or trust, and somewhat reserved even under the best of circumstances. Dwelling in mines and burrows, they are sympathetic to dwarves, but find their cousins’ aversion to surface dwellers foolish.

Due to their inquisitive nature, Gnomes receive a +1 bonus to their initial Intelligence scores, but have a -1 penalty to their Wisdom scores.

Half-Elves

Half-elves are the most common mixed-race beings. The relationship between elf, human, and half-elf is defined as follows: 1) Anyone with both elven and human ancestors is either a human or a half-elf (elves have only elven ancestors). 2) If there are more human ancestors than elven, the person is human; if there are equal numbers or more elves, the person is half-elven.

Half-elves are usually much like their elven parent in appearance. They are handsome folk, with the good features of each of their races. They mingle freely with either race, being only slightly taller than the average elf (5 feet 6 inches on average) and weighing about 150 pounds. They typically live about 160 years. They do not have all the abilities of the elf, nor do they have the flexibility of unlimited level advancement of the human. Finally, in some of the less-civilized nations, half-elves are viewed with suspicion and superstition.

In general, a half-elf has the curiosity, inventiveness, and ambition of his human ancestors and the refined senses, love of nature, and artistic tastes of his elven ancestors.

Half-elves do not form communities among themselves; rather, they can be found living in both elven and human communities. The reactions of humans and elves to half-elves ranges from intrigued fascination to outright bigotry.

Due to their close connection with humanity, they have no bonuses nor penalties to their initial ability scores.

Halflings

Halflings are short, generally plump people, very much like small humans. Their faces are round and broad and often quite florid. Their hair is typically curly and the tops of their feet are covered with coarse hair. They prefer not to wear shoes whenever possible. Their typical life expectancy is approximately 150 years.

Halflings are sturdy and industrious, generally quiet and peaceful. Overall they prefer the comforts of home to dangerous adventuring. They enjoy good living, rough humor, and homespun stories. In fact, they can be a trifle boring at times. Halflings are not forward, but they are observant and conversational if in friendly company. Halflings see wealth only as a means of gaining creature comforts, which they love. Though they are not overly brave or ambitious, they are generally honest and hard working when there is need.

Halfling homes are well-furnished burrows, although most of their work is done on the surface. Elves generally like them in a patronizing sort of way. Dwarves cheerfully tolerate them, thinking halflings somewhat soft and harmless. Gnomes, although they drink more and eat less, like halflings best, feeling them kindred spirits. Because halflings are more open and outgoing than any of these other three, they get along with other races far better.

Due to their quick feet, Halflings receive a +1 bonus to their initial Dexterity scores, but have a -1 penalty to their Strength scores.

Class[edit]

Knights are the workhorses of the fighting class, coming onto the scene with the largest selection of weapons and armor. Class minimums are Strength 14 and Constitution 14. Knights can wear any armor and can learn any weapon. They can become Experts and Masters in any weapon and all styles they are proficient in except Bow, Dagger, or Staff which are limited to Expert. They can NOT learn any magic, nor the Meditation skill. They gain the most out of the Body Building skill. Knights can be promoted to Cavalier status giving them extra hit points, and again to Champion gaining even more hit points.

Clerics are adventurous, spell-casting holy men who are mediocre fighters. Their magic is most powerful in the areas of healing and defense. Class minimums are Wisdom 14 and Charisma 14. They can only become proficient in Mace, Staff, or Bow. They can only wear wear leather or chainmail and may use a shield. They can become Experts in all weapons and styles proficient in except Staff, and can become Masters in Mace, Weapon and Chain, and Weapon and Shield. They can cast all Priest spells and Spells of Light. They can become Experts and Masters in all magic they can cast. Clerics can be promoted to Priest status gaining extra hit points and Spell Points, and again to High Priest gaining even more hit points and Spell Points.

Paladins cross the line between Knight and Cleric, performing both roles well, but not as well as either of the more focused classes alone. Class minimums are Strength 14 and Wisdom 14. Paladins can wear any armor and learn any weapon. They can become Experts in all weapons and weapon styles proficient in except Staff and Masters in Mace, Sword, Weapon and Plate, and Weapon and Shield. They have the ability to cast all Priest spells, however they can not cast Spells of Light. They can become Experts and Masters in all spells they are able to cast. Paladins can be promoted to Crusader status gaining extra hit points and Spell Points, and again to Hero gaining even more hit points and Spell Points.

Sorcerers are students of Elemental magic, concentrating on offensive and utilitarian magic. Class minimums are Intelligence 14 and Constitution 14. Downright rotten fighters they can only become proficient in Dagger, Staff, and Bow and wear only leather armor. They can become Experts and Masters in any weapon or style they are proficient in except Bow which is limited to Expert. They can cast all Sorcerer spells (Air, Earth, Fire, and Water magic) and High Sorcery. They can become Experts and Masters in all spells they are able to cast. Sorcerers can be promoted to Mage status gaining extra hit points and Spell Points, and again to Arch Mage gaining even more hit points and Spell Points.

Archers cross the line between Knight and Sorcerer, performing both roles well, but not as well as either of the more focused classes alone. Class minimums are Intelligence 14 and Dexterity 14. They can learn any weapon, however they specialize in – surprise – the bow. They can wear only leather or chainmail and can not use a shield. They can become Experts in all weapons and styles proficient in except Staff and Masters in Bow, Spear, Weapon and Leather, and Weapon and Chain. They can cast all Sorcerer spells although they can not cast spells of High Sorcery. They can become Experts and Masters in all spells they are able to cast. Archers can be promoted to Battle Mage status gaining extra hit points and Spell Points, and again to Warrior Mage gaining even more hit points and Spell Points.

Druids combine the best of the Sorcerer and Cleric classes. Class minimums are Intelligence 14 and Wisdom 14. They have few hit points and make poor fighters; their arsenal limited to Dagger, Staff and Bow and can only learn the Weapon and Leather style. They can become Experts and Masters in any weapon or style they are proficient in except Bow which is limited to Expert. However, they gain the ability to learn and use both Priest and Sorcerer spells, but do not have the ability to cast Spells of Light or High Sorcery. They can become Experts and Masters in all spells they are able to cast. Druids can be promoted to Great Druid status gaining extra hit points and Spell Points, and again to Grand Druid gaining even more hit points and Spell Points.

Experience and Levels[edit]

Experience counts. Experience is gained through defeating opponents in combat and solving the various tasks and quests in Enroth. When a character gains enough experience, they become eligible to move up a “level” in a system of status and ranking. Gaining levels increase Hit Points (hp), Spell Points (SP), and Skill Points (SkP).

The experience point requirement to increase an adventurers level is equal to the following chart:

Lvl 10 Lvl 11780,000 Lvl 213,160,000
Lvl 26,000 Lvl 12946,000 Lvl 223,486,000
Lvl 328,000 Lvl 131,128,000 Lvl 233,828,000
Lvl 466,000 Lvl 141,326,000 Lvl 244,186,000
Lvl 5120,000 Lvl 151,540,000 Lvl 254,560,000
Lvl 6190,000 Lvl 161,770,000 Lvl 264,950,000
Lvl 7276,000 Lvl 172,016,000 Lvl 275,356,000
Lvl 8378,000 Lvl 182,278,000 Lvl 285,778,000
Lvl 9496,000 Lvl 192,556,000 Lvl 296,216,000
Lvl 10630,000 Lvl 202,850,000 Lvl 306,670,000

Hit Points (hp)[edit]

Starting hp are as follows:

  • Knights: 10 + 1d6
  • Paladins/Archers: 6 + 1d4
  • Cleric: 4 + 1d4
  • Druid/Sorcerer: 2 + 1d4

The amount of hp gained when a PC gains a level is as follows:

  • Knight: 10 + 1d6, an extra +5/lvl upon Promotion to Cavalier, and another +5/lvl upon promotion to Champion
  • Paladin/Archer: 6 + 1d4, an extra +2/lvl upon Promotion to Crusader/Battle Mage, and another +2/lvl upon Promotion to Hero/Warrior Mage
  • Cleric: 4 + 1d4, an extra +1/lvl upon Promotion to Priest, and another +1/lvl upon Promotion to High Priest
  • Druid/Sorcerer: 2 + 1d4, an extra +1/lvl upon Promotion to Great Druid/Mage, and another +1/lvl upon Promotion to Grand Druid/Arch Mage

NOTE: In addition, all PC’s gain extra hp if they have a high Constitution. Also, all promotions give extra hp retroactively for previous levels gained.

A PC will be knocked unconcious when his hit points drop to zero. A PC will be killed when his hit points are brought to ½ of his Constitution below zero. (i.e. A PC has a Constitution of 14. She is knocked unconcious at 0 hp, and dies at -7 hp)

Spell Points (SP)[edit]

Starting SP are as follows:

  • Clerics/Paladins: Clerics get 20 SP to start plus Wisdom bonuses. Paladins get 10 SP to start plus Wisdom bonuses.
  • Sorcerers/Archers: Sorcerers get 20 SP to start plus Intelligence bonuses. Archers get 10 SP to start plus Intelligence bonuses.
  • Druids: Druids get 20 SP to start plus both Intelligence and Wisdom bonuses.

The amount of SP gained when a PC gains a level is as follows:

  • Clerics/Sorcerers gain 12 SP every lvl, +4/lvl upon Promotion to Priest/Mage, and another +4/lvl upon Promotion to High Priest/Arch Mage
  • Paladins/Archers gain 6 SP every lvl, +1/lvl upon Promotion to Crusader/Battle Mage, and another +1/lvl upon Promotion to Hero/Warrior Mage
  • Druids gain 12 SP/lvl, +4/lvl upon Promotion to Great Druid, and another +4/lvl upon Promotion to Grand Druid

For example: A 3rd level Sorcerer with a 16 Intelligence would have 44 (level) + 6 (Int bonus) for a total of 50 SP, while a 7th level Mage with an 18 Intelligence would have 92 (level) + 28 (Mage status) + 14 SP (Int bonus) for a total of 134 SP

NOTE: All spellcasters upon Promotion gain extra SP retroactively for previous levels gained.

Skill Points (SkP)[edit]

Skill Points (SkP): SkP are used to improve individual skills learned throughout a PC’s adventuring career. Each skill learned (weapon, weapon style, non-weapon, and magic) has a skill ranking, regardless of the level of the PC. SkP are gained each time a PC goes up an experience level. Skill rankings are increased when a PC spends SkP to improve them. To increase a skill, the SkP required is equal to the next skill rank number. For example, if a PC wishes to increase his/her Dagger skill from a rank 3 to rank 4, the number of SkP needed is 4.

Another way to improve skills is to find a teacher. These teachers may agree to increase a PC’s skill from “Normal” to “Expert”, or even from “Expert” to “Master”! A more impressive title gives the PC some special abilities that aren’t generally the same for each skill. For instance, a Master mace swinger gains the power to stun opponents, while a Master swordsman can use another weapon with a sword with no penalty!

Proficiencies:[edit]

Weapon Proficiencies[edit]

There are both weapon and weapon style proficiencies. There are no limits for such proficiencies and all applicable skills may be taken if the PC has the money to learn the skill.

Weapon Proficiencies are as follows: Axe (incl Poleaxes and Halberds), Bow (incl Crossbows), Dagger, Mace (incl Hammers), Spear (incl Tridents and Halberds), Staff, and Sword (all types).

Attack abilities are as follows:

All PC Attack adjustments (AT adj) are based on weapon skill levels. The higher the adjustment the better chance to strike one’s opponent. See Combat for more information. How this adjustment increases depends on the PC’s class:

  • Knight/Paladin adjustments increase 1 point every weapon skill level they achieve after 1st. (i.e., Lvl 2: +1, Lvl 3: +2, Lvl 4: +3, etc.)
  • Archer/Cleric adjustments increase 2 points every three weapon skill levels they achieve after 1st. (Exception: Archers use Bow skills equal to Knights) (i.e., Lvl 4: +2, Lvl 7: +4, Lvl 10: +6, etc.)
  • Druid/Sorcerer adjustments increase 1 point every two weapon skill levels they achieve after 1st. (i.e., Lvl 3: +1, Lvl 5: +2, Lvl 7: +3, etc.)

Weapon Style Proficiencies are Weapon and Shield, Weapon and Leather, Weapon and Chain, Weapon and Plate. If a PC does not know a particular weapon style, he/she may NOT wear that type of armor and use a weapon or cast a spell!

For every five levels in Weapon and Armor styles (Leather, Chain, Plate, and Shield) after 1st, PC’s gain a bonus of +1 to their AC (Armor Class) (i.e., Lvl 6: +1, Lvl 11: +2, etc.)

After some experience in any proficiency, PC’s may become Experts in their weapons or weapon styles. Expertise in weapon proficiencies and weapon styles are as follows:

  • Axe – gains an attack speed bonus (-1 to SF for Axes and -2 to SF for Poleaxes) and gains an attack ‘to hit’ bonus of +1
  • Bow – gains an attack speed bonus (-2 to SF), and gains an attack ‘to hit’ bonus of +1
  • Dagger – gains the ability to use another dagger in his/her off hand with no penalty, gaining another attack, and gains an attack ‘to hit’ bonus of +1
  • Mace – gains an attack ‘to hit’ bonus of +1 and a damage bonus of +2
  • Spear – gains an attack ‘to hit’ bonus of +1 and an AC bonus of +1
  • Staff – gains an attack ‘to hit’ bonus of +1 and an AC bonus of +1
  • Sword – gains an attack speed bonus (-1 to SF on one handed and -2 SF on two handed) and gains an attack ‘to hit’ bonus of +1
  • Weapon and Shield – gains a bonus of +1 AC to both melee and missile attacks
  • Weapon and Leather – reduces the speed penalty of wearing leather armor by half
  • Weapon and Chain – reduces the speed penalty of wearing chain mail armor by half
  • Weapon and Plate – reduces the speed penalty of wearing plate armor by half

NOTE: Knights get an extra bonus of 1/2 an Attack per round (AT/rnd) with the weapon (except Bow) they become an Expert in. This allows one attack on odd rounds, and two attacks on even rounds of combat.

After more experience as Experts in their weapon or weapon styles, PC’s may become Masters. Mastery in weapon proficiencies and weapon styles are as follows:

  • Axe – gains an attack damage bonus of +4
  • Bow – gains the ability to fire twice as many shots per round as the weapon normally gives (i.e. Bows AT 4/1, Crossbows 2/1)
  • Dagger – gains the ability equal to the level of the skill (i.e. 14th level skill has a 14% chance) on a successful hit to do triple base weapon damage
  • Mace – gains the ability equal to the level of the skill (as above) on a successful hit to stun his/her opponent (as a basic Stun spell at Mace skill lvl)
  • Spear – gains an attack damage bonus of +4
  • Staff – gains the ability equal to the level of the skill (as above) on a successful hit to stun his/her opponent (as above)
  • Sword – gains the ability to use another sword in his/her off hand with no penalty, gaining another attack
  • Weapon and Shield – gains a bonus of +1 AC to both melee and missile attacks
  • Weapon and Leather – removes the speed penalty of wearing leather armor
  • Weapon and Chain – removes the speed penalty of wearing chain mail armor
  • Weapon and Plate – removes the speed penalty of wearing plate armor

NOTE: Knights get another extra 1/2 AT/rnd when they become Masters in a weapon (except Bow) giving two attacks per round with that weapon.

Non-Weapon Proficiencies[edit]

Non-weapon proficiencies are similar to weapon proficiencies and styles. They are not governed by Intelligence limitations and any class can learn any skill as long as they have the money. Some classes are better than others to use particular skills. After some experience in the skill, the PC can become an Expert if they can find a teacher. After more experience as an Expert, the PC can then become a Master in that skill if another teacher is found.

These are the Non-Weapon Proficiencies used in Enroth:

Alchemy: Having this skill allows the brewing and mixing of herbal potions. Also, anyone with this skill can automatically tell the type of potion upon sight without tasting. The power of potions able to be created depends upon the class of the user. Any class can take this skill, but only Clerics, Druids, and Sorcerers can become Experts and only Druids can become Masters.

  • Basic potions: Any class
  • Compound Potions: Clerics, Druids and Sorcerers
  • White Potions: Druids and Sorcerers and Expert ability
  • Black Potions: Druids only and Master ability

Bodybuilding: Taking this proficiency allows a PC to add additional hit points (hp) to their totals for every new skill level they achieve. The number of hit points gains depends on their level of knowledge and their class. Any class can take this skill.

  • Knights: +2 hp/level at Basic Level, +4 hp/level at Expert, and +6/level at Master
  • Paladin/Archer: +1 hp/level at Basic, +2 hp/level at Expert, and +3 hp/level at Master
  • Cleric: +1 hp/level at Basic, +2 hp/level at Expert, May not become Masters
  • Sorcerer/Druid: +1 hp/level at Basic, may not become Experts or Masters

Diplomacy: This proficiency allows a PC to affect their reputation with others in any direction they desire. Having a high Diplomacy can allow PC’s to talk their way out of a dangerous situation or improve talks with high ranking officials. Any class can take this skill but only Paladins and Clerics can become Masters in it.

  • Basic level: An improvement of +1 Charisma reaction/4 levels (Lvl 1: +1, Lvl 5: +2, etc.)
  • Expert level: An improvement of +1 Charisma reaction/3 levels (Lvl 1: +1, Lvl 4: +2, etc.)
  • Master level: An improvement of +1 Charisma reaction/2 levels (Lvl 1: +1, Lvl 3: +2, etc.)

Disarm Trap: Taking this proficiency allows a PC a chance to disarm booby trapped containers or locks. Only traps found by a successful Perception check can be disarmed. Any class can learn this skill, however only Archers can become Masters.

  • Basic level: +1 adjustment/level to disarm a trap (Lvl 1: +1, Lvl 2: +2, etc.)
  • Expert level: +3 adjustment/two levels to disarm a trap (Lvl 1: +3, Lvl 3: +6, etc.)
  • Master level: +2 adjustment/level to disarm a trap (Lvl 1: +2, Lvl 2: +4, etc.)

Each trap has a difficulty target number to automatically disarm it. The PC rolls a d20 and adds his or her skill adjustment. If the total score is equal or greater than the target number, the trap is disarmed. If the roll fails to meet the target number, the trap is set off. Points in Perception skill will reduce some of the damage caused by traps.

Identify Item: This proficiency gives the user the ability to identify the qualities and abilities of any item (normal or magical). Any class can learn this skill, however only Sorcerers can become Masters.

  • Basic level: +1 adjustment/level to identify items (Lvl 1: +1, Lvl 2: +2, etc.)
  • Expert level: +3 adjustment/two levels to identify items (Lvl 1: +3, Lvl 3: +6, etc.)
  • Master level: +2 adjustment/level to identify items (Lvl 1: +2, Lvl 2: +4, etc.)

Each item has a difficulty target number to automatically identify it. The PC rolls a d20 and adds his or her skill adjustment. If the total score is equal or greater than the target number, the item is identified. If the skill level fails to meet the target number, the PC must give it to another PC to check, or have it checked at an Armor, Weapon, or Alchemist shop.

Learning: This useful skill gives the PC an extra bonus to their experience gained. Any class can learn this skill and become Experts or Masters in it.

  • Basic level: 9% + 1% XP bonus/level (Lvl 1: 10%, Lvl 2: 11%, etc.)
  • Expert level: 9% + 2% XP bonus/level (Lvl 1: 11%, Lvl 2: 13%, etc.)
  • Master level: 9% + 3% XP bonus/level (Lvl 1: 12%, Lvl 2: 15%, etc.)

Meditation: This skill is similar to Body Building except it is for spell casters and it increases their Spell Points. All classes except Knights can learn this skill and become Experts or Masters in it. The number of bonus SP depends upon their class:

  • Paladins/Archers: 1 SP/level at Basic, 2 SP/level at Expert, and 3 SP/level at Master
  • Clerics/Sorcerers: 2 SP/level at Basic, 4 SP/level at Expert, and 6 SP/level at Master
  • Druids: 2 SP/level at Basic, 5 SP/level at Expert, and 7 SP/level at Master

Merchant: Buying and selling in Enroth is a healthy barter system and successful Merchants are the key. All places where something is sold, it is sold at a (sometimes very high) marked up price. PCs skilled in the Merchant skill can get better prices when trying to purchase or sell items. Any class can learn this skill, however Knights, Paladins, and Clerics cannot become Masters.

  • Basic level: 7% + 3% better price or lowered markup/level bonus (Lvl 1: 10%, Lvl 2: 13%, etc.)
  • Expert level: 7% + 6% better price or lowered markup/level bonus (Lvl 1: 13%, Lvl 2: 19%, etc.)
  • Master level: 7% + 9% better price or lowered markup/level bonus (Lvl 1: 16%, Lvl 2: 25%, etc.)

Merchant is computed this way. The price at any particular merchant is marked up for purchases or marked down for selling back. The Merchant skill takes the marked up/down price and subtracts/adds the percentage of the skill from that price. If the result is still above cost, that is the price. If the price is equal or below cost, the price is cost. For example, an item is being sold at 150 gp and cost price is 100 gp. A Merchant skill of 1 will give a 10% discount on the marked up price which is equal to 15 gp. Subtract the 15 gp from 150 gp for a total of 135 gp. This is how much the vendor will sell the item to that PC. An example of buying back is a PC wishes sell an item to a vendor that has a cost price of 100 gp. The vendor is normally willing to buy the item back for 20 gp. The percentage times cost equals 10 gp. The vendor adds this number to the sell back price and gets a total of 30 gp. This is how much the vendor will buy the item from the PC for.

Perception: This skill is a definite must for those who want to find that needle in the haystack. Having this skill allows the PC to find hidden treasures, secret doors, and traps. It also reduces the damage taken from an improperly disarmed trap. Any class can learn this skill, however only Archers can become Masters.

  • Basic level: +1 adjustment/level and a 1% reduced damage/level (Lvl 1: +1/1%, Lvl 2: +2/2%, etc.)
  • Expert level: +3 adjustment/two levels and a 2% reduced damage/level (Lvl 1: +3/2%, Lvl 3: +6/+6%, etc.)
  • Master level: +2 adjustment/level and a 4% reduced damage/level (Lvl 1: +2/4%, Lvl 2: +4/8%, etc.)

Each item/secret door/trap has a difficulty target number to automatically discover it. The PC rolls a d20 and adds his or her skill adjustment. If the total score is equal or greater than the target number, the trap/secret door/treasure is discovered. For example: Rath has a level 2 Basic Perception. He has a +2 bonus adjustment to discover a trap, but if it is set off, he gets a 2% reduction in any damage received (minimum of 1 hp)

A failed check misses the trap or secret item, however another check is allowed at a -1 adjustment cumulative penalty for each additional try. Each check takes 1 round and searches a 10X10 area or one item.

Repair Item: All items over time can break, and there are some monsters whose blows are so powerful that they can break items in two. PCs knowledgeable in this skill can do a field level repair quickly so that the item can be used until it is brought to a service shop. This skill allows the PC to use service shops at reduced prices to fix the items themselves saving a great deal of money. Some items are very complex and can only be repaired with Expert or Master level. All classes can learn this skill, however only Paladins, Archers, and Knights can become Experts and only Knights can become Masters.

  • Basic level: +1 adjustment/level to repair/3% + 2%/level repair cost savings (Lvl 1: +1/5%, Lvl 2: +2/7%, etc.)
  • Expert level: +3 adjustment/two levels to repair/3% + 4%/level repair cost savings (Lvl 1: +3/7%, Lvl 3: +6/15%, etc.)
  • Master level: +2 adjustment/level to repair/3% + 7%/level repair cost savings (Lvl 1: +2/10%, Lvl 2: +4/17%, etc.)

Each item has a difficulty target number to automatically repair it. The PC rolls a d20 and adds his or her skill adjustment. If the total score is equal or greater than the target number, the item is repaired. If the skill level fails to meet the target number, the PC must give it to another PC to repair, or have it repaired at an Armor, Weapon, or Alchemist shop.

Starting Skills:[edit]

PC’s begin with a limited number of skills and can choose from a short list at character creation depending upon class.

  • Knights: Begin automatically with the skills of Sword, and Weapon and Leather. They can choose two more from the following list: Dagger, Axe, Spear, Bow, Weapon and Chain, Weapon and Shield, Body Building, Disarm Trap, or Perception.
  • Paladins: Begin automatically with the skills of Sword and Spirit Magic. They can choose two more from the following list: Dagger, Spear, Mace, Weapon and Leather, Weapon and Chain, Weapon and Shield, Perception, Diplomacy, or Disarm Trap
  • Archers: Begin automatically with the skills of Bow and Air Magic. They can choose two more from the following list: Sword, Dagger, Axe, Weapon and Leather, Fire Magic, Identify Item, Perception, Diplomacy, or Disarm Trap
  • Clerics: Begin automatically with the skills of Mace and Body Magic. They can choose two more from the following list: Staff, Weapon and Leather, Weapon and Shield, Spirit Magic, Mind Magic, Identify Item, Repair Item, Meditation, Diplomacy
  • Sorcerer: Begin automatically with the skills of Dagger and Fire Magic. They can choose two more from the following list: Staff, Weapon and Leather, Air Magic, Earth Magic, Water Magic, Identify Item, Repair Item, Meditation, or Diplomacy
  • Druid: Begin automatically with the skills of Staff and Earth Magic. They can choose two more from the following list: Mace, Weapon and Leather, Water Magic, Spirit Magic, Body Magic, Identify Item, Alchemy, Meditation, or Learning

Equipment[edit]

Purchasing Equipment[edit]

Gold is the coin of the realm and is about the size of a penny. There are other items that are replacements for gold such as gems, but they are rare and must be discovered by the PCs.

Equipment can be purchased at any store in the realm. Weaponsmiths sell weapons, but most specialize in one weapon style, so shop around. Weaponsmiths also can identify and repair weapons for a cost. Armories sell, identify and repair shields and armor, and as weaponsmiths, some may specialize in certain kinds of armor. Magic Shops and Apothecaries offer potions and miscellaneous arcane items. They can identify and repair such items as well for a price. General Stores sell the junk that other stores do not want to sell. They tend to be overpriced and they buyback at very reduced prices.

Having a PC with a high Merchant skill comes in handy when talking to shop owners. The storekeeper will always tell the PCs how much the item is and a little background about it. All shops will negotiate with a PC with Merchant skill to haggle over the price. No skill or a low skill will leave the PCs penniless, while a high Mastered skill will leave the storekeeper crying in his or her cash box. Merchant skill also comes in handy when trying to sell “liberated” items to the store keeper. The higher the Merchant skill, the better the buyback price.

Banks are places where PCs can store their gold should it be weighing down their packs. There is no charge for storage and PCs can withdraw their funds from any branch.

Spell Guilds are places to learn magic and purchase spellbooks. Merchant skill is handy here as well as the Guildmasters will also haggle over prices.

Thief or Mercenary Guilds have teachers that, for a price, will teach PCs varied Weapon and Non-weapon skills. Merchant skill will bring down prices here as well.

Temples offer a chance to give a donation to or receive healing from for a price. Fees are set and Merchant will not change the prices. Generous donations will receive a boon from the attending priest.

Inns and Taverns rent rooms, sell traveling rations, and offer drinks and information about the local area. Merchant skill will help keep you out of the common room for the night.

Training Halls are places to advance in levels. All classes come here, although some places have limited staff and level maximums. Training takes a week per level for advancement (i.e. raising from 5th to 6th takes one week) and includes increases in skills through spending Skill Points. Training costs gold and each progressive level costs more. Having the Merchant skill can lower the prices somewhat.

Stables and Docks are places of transportation and will allow quicker and safer transport to various cities and places in the realm. Having a high Merchant skill will lower prices. Schedules vary per area, so check with the stablemaster or ship captain for information.

Local City Councils are always in need of able adventurers to take on a variety of dangerous quests, so look them up when you come to a town.

Starting Equipment[edit]

PC’s starting equipment depends upon what skills they choose at character creation. They gain a basic weapon for the weapon skill(s) they choose, i.e. Dagger, Mace, Staff, Longsword, Spear, Hand Axe, and/or Crossbow. If they choose a weapon style, they will receive either Leather Armor, Chainmail Armor, and/or a Wooden Shield. Spellcasters choosing Magic skills will receive the first two spells from each spell list they choose. PC’s also get a random simple potion and a simple ring which is randomly decided by the DM. There is a very slight chance that this ring will be enchanted.

Armor and Weapons[edit]

NameWeight (in pounds)Speed FactorAC adj/Damage
Leather Armor15+4+2 to AC
Chainmail Armor40+8+5 to AC
Wooden Shield5N/A+1 to AC for missiles
Dagger1/2+21d4
Hand Axe5+41d6
Mace6+61d6
Staff4+41d6
Longsword4+51d8
Spear (one-handed)5+61d6
Spear (two-handed)+82d6
Crossbow (AT 1/1)
Range: 6/12/18
7+71d6

Speed Factor or SF is the penalty to initiative representing the inherent slowness of the weapon or how much the armor slows a PC down. Certain skills or magic abilities can reduce this number. SF for any particular weapon or armor can never be brought lower than 0.

Armor Class is a term showing the amount of physical protection a PC, NPC, or monster has. It begins at 10 (absolutely no protection), and increases based on the AC adj value of armor worn. There is no limit to how protected something may be. To improve Armor Class, one requires a high dexterity, improved armor, or magical protection. Some creatures may have naturally strong armor classes, therefore requiring a high ability ‘to hit’.

NOTE: In addition to any of the above items, a starting party will begin with 200 pieces of gold (gp).

Combat[edit]

Combat in Enroth is very simple. Rounds are 15 seconds in length and turns are 10 minutes in length.

  • Step 1: Check for surprise (if applicable): Surprise is rolled on a d10. Add Dexterity bonuses to the roll and then subtract any penalties opponents give. If the final number is 1-3, the person is surprised. Surprise lasts for 1 round, and gives the penalty of no Dexterity bonuses and the inability to attack for that round.
  • Step 2: Roll initiative: 1d10 + Armor SF + Weapon SF or Spell Casting Time, lowest goes first. Spells that take a round to cast, always go last and the effect begins at the beginning of the next round. If a PC or monster has more than one attack, roll initiative for each attack. If a PC or monster casts a spell that takes one round, no other attacks may be made that round, even if that PC or monster has more attacks. Spellcasting does not affect Armor Class or Dexterity, the PC/NPC/monster can fully defend himself during that time. If a PC decides to not attack and fully defend himself, he receives a +4 bonus to his Armor Class for that round.
  • Step 3: Counting from Initiative score of zero, on the initiative turn, make attack roll (weapons or some spells) with d20 against opponents Armor Class adding appropriate adjustments. (e.g. If a Knight PC has a Sword Lvl 4 (+3 Adj) and the opponents Armor Class is 15, then the number to equal or beat on a d20 roll is 12). If there is a tie for initiative the highest Dexterity goes first.

NOTE: A roll of 20 is always a hit and a roll of a 1 is always a miss, regardless of the actual number required ‘to hit’.

  • Step 4: If a hit made, roll damage and subtract protections (if applicable)
  • Step 5: Next PC/monster attacks, until next round.

Ranged Combat[edit]

  • Initiative: Ranged weapons have a special roll for intiative. They roll standard initiative, and then divide the total by the number of attacks (e.g., A roll of 12 with a Bow has the first shot on a 6, the second on a 12.) For odd numbers, round up (e.g., A roll of 13 with a Bow has the first shot on a 7, the second on a 13.)
  • Range: All ranged weapons have three effective ranges: Short, Medium, and Long Range. The first number is Short range, the second is Medium range, and the final is Long range. To calculate maximum ranges, use the number X 10 feet for indoors, and the number X 10 yards for outdoors. The GM will determine how far the opponent is away from the PC. If the opponent is in Short range, there is no “to hit” penalty. If the opponent is in Medium range, there is a -2 “to hit” penalty. If the opponent is in Long range, there is a -5 “to hit” penalty. If the opponent is beyond the maximum range of the weapon, there is no chance to hit that opponent.

Luck[edit]

Luck rolls represent the innate magical resistance and chance a particular PC, NPC, or monster has. The more powerful the attacker is, the less chance to resist the magic the opponent has. The less powerful the attacker is, the more chance to resist the magic the opponent has.

All PC’s, NPC’s, and monsters have a Luck target number of 11 against all forms of magic. When a Luck roll is called for, roll d20, add +1 for every level of the defender’s Experience level, and add any other adjustments. Add +1 to the target number for every skill level of the opponent’s spell or power. If the total rolled is equal or higher to the target number, the magic is resisted as the spell description notes. If the roll is lower, the Luck roll fails.

For example: A Lvl 3 Fireball is cast at a Lvl 5 PC. The PC has a +5 bonus for level. The opponent has a +3 bonus for spell power making the target number 14. If a 9 or higher is rolled on a d20, the spell does only 1/2 damage.

  • A Luck roll target number can be no higher than 20 and no lower than 2. A roll of 20 always is successful and a 1 is always a failure.
  • For every +1 bonus to Luck rolls, add +1 to the PC’s, NPC’s, monster’s Luck roll.

Movement and Encumbrance[edit]

Movement in Enroth is based on feet per round indoors and yards per round outdoors. Base movement depends on a PC’s race.

  • Dwarves, Gnomes, and Halflings have a base movement rate of 60 feet/yards per round.
  • Elves, Half-Elves, and Humans have a base movement rate of 120 feet/yards per round.

Movement in combat is equal to half the normal movement rate in a round. If the PC wants to move up to their full movement rate in that round, they may either not attack, or suffer a -4 ‘to hit’ penalty for that round.

Movement rate can be doubled when moving at a run. Running can be contined for a number of rounds equal to the PC’s Constitution before that PC’s must rest (by not running or fighting) for double the number of rounds spent running. For example, if a PC runs for 5 rounds, he/she must rest for 2 minutes and 30 seconds before being able to run again at full strength. Should a PC be at his/her limit and needs to fight/run during their required rest time, he/she suffers from the effect of Encumbered.

Encumbrance normally occurs when a PC’s is carrying more than his/her Strength’s weight allowance allows. When a PC is encumbered his/her movement rate is halved and all dexterity bonuses are lost.

Conditions and Effects[edit]

There are several effects that may happen to a PC, NPC, or monster. Each of them gives some form of penalty. Some will be stated here, others will have to be discovered as the PC’s travel through Enroth.

Afraid effect occurs when a PC is affected by the Mass Fear spell or affected by a monster’s attack. An afraid PC has a 50% chance to drop each item in his/her hands, and will run in the opposite direction at full running movement rate until the duration is over, or the PC collapses in exhaustion. An afraid PC cannot attack or defend him/herself but since he/she is aware of the surroundings, a regular roll against his/her AC is required. This effect can be also removed by casting a Remove Fear spell in time, going to a temple, or through Divine Intervention.

Asleep effect occurs when a PC is sleeping or is magically put to sleep by a monster’s attack. A sleeping PC cannot attack nor defend themselves. A sleeping PC is automatically hit. If naturally asleep, the PC will wake up upon being struck. An asleep PC cannot receive any XP. If magically asleep, the PC will wake only if the duration of the condition ends, a powerful enough Awaken spell is cast, going to a temple, or through Divine Intervention.

Curse effect occurs when a PC is affected by a Mass Curse spell or affected by a monster’s attack. A cursed PC has only a 50% chance to cast any spells. If a spell fails, the SP used is still wasted. A Remove Curse spell cast in time can remove this effect as well as going to a temple or through Divine Intervention.

Death effect occurs when a PC’s hp are reduced to 1/2 of their Consitution beyond zero, is affected by a Finger of Death spell, or affected by a monster’s attack. A dead PC receives no XP and can be restored only by a Raise Dead or Resurrection spell cast in time, going to a temple, or Divine Intervention.

Paralyze effect occurs when a PC is affected by a Paralyze spell or affected by a monster’s attack. A paralyzed PC is immobilized and cannot communicate with others. A paralyzed PC is automatically hit. A paralyzed PC receives no XP. A Remove Paralysis spell cast in time can remove this effect as well as going to a temple or through Divine Intervention.

Stoned effect occurs when a PC is affected by a Turn to Stone spell or affected by a monster’s attack. A stoned PC is immobilized and oblivious to the world. The PC receives no XP and is also impervious to all damage while affected. A Stone to Flesh spell cast in time will remove this condition as well as going to a temple or through Divine Intervention.

Weak effect occurs when a PC has stayed awake for 24 hours or more, is suffering the side-effect of the Haste spell, or affected by a monster’s attack. A weak PC’s Strength is lowered by 3/4 and their Constitution is lowered by 1/2 with all the penalties associated with this drop. This effect lasts until the PC can rest for a full 8 hours, a Cure Weakness spell cast in time, going to a temple, or through Divine Intervention.

Unconcious effect occurs when a PC is brought to zero hit points. An unconcious PC receives no XP and can be restored through a full night’s rest, magical healing bringing hp above zero, or going to a temple.

Zombie effect occurs when a PC is affected by a Reanimate spell. The PC will simply follow the caster around and perform no other actions. The PC is not aware of his/her surroundings and cannot contribute to any conversations. A PC with this condition receives no XP. This effect can be removed only by a temple or Divine Intervention.